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Paso Robles Precipitation

Period of Record : 10/1/1901 to 12/31/2005


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Annual

Average Total Precipitation (in.)

3.15

3.16

2.40

1.05

0.28

0.05

0.03

0.04

0.19

0.55

1.39

2.63

14.91

Average Total SnowFall (in.)

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

 

Percent of possible observations for period of record.
Max. Temp.: 70.3% Min. Temp.: 70.1% Precipitation: 70.3% Snowfall: 52.7% Snow Depth: 52.7%


Santa Margarita Precipitation

Period of Record : 12/1/1942 to 4/30/2009


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Annual

Average Total Precipitation (in.)

6.91

6.15

4.86

2.34

0.62

0.08

0.03

0.05

0.35

1.34

3.46

5.18

31.38

Percent of possible observations for period of record.
Max. Temp.: 2.2% Min. Temp.: 2.2% Precipitation: 98.5% Snowfall: 98.7% Snow Depth: 98.6%
Check Station Metadata or Metadata graphics for more detail about data completeness.

San Luis Obispo Precipitation

Period of Record : 2/ 1/1893 to 4/30/2009


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Annual

Average Total Precipitation (in.)

5.00

4.70

3.44

1.51

0.43

0.11

0.02

0.04

0.27

0.91

2.16

4.00

22.58

Percent of possible observations for period of record.
Max. Temp.: 96.3% Min. Temp.: 96.3% Precipitation: 96.2% Snowfall: 96.2% Snow Depth: 96.2%
Check Station Metadata or Metadata graphics for more detail about data completeness.

From: http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ca7933

Morro Bay Precipitation

Period of Record : 8/22/1959 to 6/30/1977


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Annual

Average Total Precipitation (in.)

3.31

2.90

2.36

1.36

0.26

0.03

0.03

0.12

0.42

0.75

2.36

2.77

16.66

Percent of possible observations for period of record.
Max. Temp.: 2.1% Min. Temp.: 2.1% Precipitation: 99.1% Snowfall: 99.1% Snow Depth: 99.1%


 Residential Water Use Summary. Source:  (AWWARF (American Water Works Association Research Foundation), 1999)

Fixture/EndUse

Avg. gallons per capita per day

Avg. liters per capita per day

Indoor use percent

Total use percent

Toilet

18.5

70.0

30.9%

10.8%

Clothes washer

15

56.8

25.1%

8.7%

Shower

11.6

43.9

19.4%

6.8%

Faucet

10.9

41.3

18.2%

6.3%

Other domestic

1.6

6.1

2.7%

0.9%

Bath

1.2

4.5

2.0%

0.7%

Dishwasher

1

3.8

1.7%

0.6%

Indoor Total

59.8

226.3

100.0%

34.8%

Leak

9.5

36.0

NA

5.5%

Unknown

1.7

6.4

NA

1.0%

Outdoor

100.8

381.5

NA

58.7%

TOTAL

171.8

650.3

NA

100.0%

 

 

 

The following practices serve to maximize the quality of harvested rainwater and should be followed as ‘Best Practice’. These guidelines have been developed drawing from a number of sources including Australian roof and tank water quality studies and other manuals.

If above-ground tank: incorporate first flush device; ensure underground tanks are well contained. Studies show that fecal contaminants from roof water are generally from animal or bird droppings. Whilst not necessarily contributing to human illness, these contaminants elevate fecal coliforms. Similarly, underground tanks can be subject to contaminants from soil and run off (contaminants such as pesticides, human and animal excreta) and should be well sealed to prevent soil entry into the system. 

Seal tanks from animal entry, maintain mesh to stop mosquitoes, ensure system design prevents  children’s entry, mark “Danger – Confined Space” for systems able to be entered for cleaning and maintenance.  Animals getting into systems and drowning are a potential source of contamination. Seal against entry, cut back branches. System can be emptied or chlorinated to disinfect. As with all standing water, must be secured against mosquitoes to stop breeding. All standing water also presents drowning risk for children, requiring that system include measures to prevent entry by children.

Supply bathing water via HWS.  Coombes (Coombes P. K., 2000) study showed that underground storm water tanks with soil incursion showed fecal coliforms present. When passed through HWS between126 -149 °F (can be an instantaneous HWS), total bacterial counts conformed with ADWG. If system is not intended for potable purposes, requiring incorporation of  a UV filter system, then recommend water used for bathing passed though a HWS which reaches between 126 -149 °F.

Incorporate roof washer / first flush device. The ‘first flush’ device in particular has been shown to substantially remove contaminants such as those associated with bird droppings, dust etc.  (Studies indicate ‘first flush’ reduces contaminant levels by up to 84%). Remove first 1.3 gallons of roof water.

Ensure rainwater is not in contact with hazardous substances. For example, bitumen or asbestos-based roof tiles; lead flashing (can be coated); acrylic paints (leach chemicals on first few run-offs); lead pipe work or paints; no contact with treated wood;  gutters kept clear of leaf litter (organic matter feeds bacteria); algae growth inhibited by not allowing light in; no contact with poisonous plants (e.g. oleander);

Desludge tank when necessary –incorporate into tank design .This bottom layer of sediment is a concentration of contaminants and should be optimally removed every 1-2 years. Soil in bottom also fuels microbial growth.

If warranted, test water regularly. If particular contaminants have been found in city water supplies, then it is prudent to test for those contaminant levels regularly in rainwater tanks.

Concrete, galvanized steel or plastic tank (with food-grade liner for potable purposes). These systems are the most successful in Australia. These can be in the form of tanks/ cisterns, barrels or ‘pillows’ (soft plastic containers for under houses). Other materials such as wood and fiberglass can be used but are less common.  Issues to watch for include –

Water quality/taste issues for new tank e.g. bitter taste due to leaching of lime into the water from concrete tanks; metallic (steel tank) or plastic taste (plastic tank). Liners prevent this issue and it will also diminish with use of the tank. The first fill water can be used for non-potable uses to avoid problem if no liner used.

 Immediately repair liner if damaged in cleaning or with chemical. Be aware some coatings are sensitive to sunlight (no light should be let in tank regardless as noted above to inhibit algae growth).

Areas subject to significant seismic activity should use more flexible tank materials (not concrete) to avoid cracking.

Areas with high fire-risk should consider the highly flammable nature of polyethylene tanks. Australian Building Code accounts for fire safety by requiring tank placement 1.5’ from dwelling which is also recommended for U.S. zones subject to significant fire risk. (Sunshine Coast Regional Council, 2008)

 

 

Table 1.0

Annual Rainfall Yield in Gallons for Various Roof Sizes and Rainfall Amounts

ROOF SIZE IN
SQUARE FEET

RAINFALL IN INCHES

20

24

28

32

36

40

44

48

52

1000

11236

13483

15730

17978

20225

22472

24719

26966

29214

1100

12360

14832

17303

19775

22247

24719

27191

29663

32135

1200

13483

16180

18876

21573

24270

26966

29663

32360

35056

1300

14607

17528

20450

23371

26292

29214

32135

35056

37978

1400

15730

18876

22023

25169

28315

31461

34607

37753

40899

1500

16854

20225

23596

26966

30337

33708

37079

40450

43820

1600

17978

21573

25169

28764

32360

35955

39551

43146

46742

1700

19101

22921

26742

30562

34382

38202

42023

45843

49663

1800

20225

24270

28315

32360

36405

40450

44495

48540

52584

1900

21348

25618

29888

34157

38427

42697

46966

51236

55506

2000

22472

26966

31461

35955

40450

44944

49438

53933

58427

2100

23596

28315

33034

37753

42472

47191

51910

56629

61349

2200

24719

29663

34607

39551

44495

49438

54382

59326

64270

2300

25843

31011

36180

41348

46517

51686

56854

62023

67191

2400

26966

32360

37753

43146

48540

53933

59326

64719

70113

2500

28090

33708

39326

44944

50562

56180

61798

67416

73034

 

From: http://rainwater.sustainablesources.com/

Summary of Key Legislative Parameters for West Coast Cities

 

San Luis Obispo, CA

Allowed? Y or N

Portland, OR

Allowed? Y or N

Seattle, WA

Allowed? Y or N

Greywater reuse

YES

Title 22  β

YES

Through Building Codes Division (statewide)

YES

Uses amended Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC)

Rainwater for toilet flush

NO

Title 24 – Must be treated to tertiary standards β

YES

As per ENB 15.71

(see below)

YES

 

Greywater for toilet flush

NO

(See above)

YES

OSPB Building Code Standards α

YES

Uses UPC

Waterless toilets

Allowed, though supply piping still required by code

Not found

YES°

Rainwater Harvesting

Not addressed

YES

Permit issued for interior or interior/Exterior Use

ENB-15.71 S 3101.2 and S 3401.1 – One and Two Family Dwelling Specialty Code

S 301.2 and Section 601.1 – Plumbing Specialty Code: Ch.16∞

If for irrigation only, no permit necessary

YES

Permit issued

 

 

 

If non-pressurized or landscape only – not required

Rainwater for potable use

Not addressed

YES

The Office of Planning andDevelopment Review (OPDR) reviews through an administrative appeal process on a system by system basis.

NO

 

According to Dept. of Health.

Backflow Prevention Device

YES

Title 17®

YES

Only certain approved devices under OAR 333-061-0070 µ

YES

Health Dept.

β Source: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/certlic/drinkingwater/Documents/Lawbook/RWregulations-01-2009.pdf

® Source: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/certlic/drinkingwater/Documents/Lawbook/dwregulations-01-01-2009.pdf

α Source: http://www.cbs.state.or.us/external/bcd/boards/plumbing/boardpack/08/20080411/Plumb_041108_VIIb.pdf

Source: http://sustainability.ucsb.edu/conference2007/presentations/Elliot-SLO-Water-Conservation.pdf

Source: http://www.cbs.state.or.us/external/bcd/notices/20080711_greywater_nr.pdf

Source: http://www.portlandonline.com/auditor/index.cfm?a=81417andc=38527

µ Source: http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/ph/crossconnection/assembly.shtml

Source: http://www.seattle.gov/dpd/publications/cam/CAM701.pdf

° Source: http://www.doh.wa.gov/ehp/ts/WW/Water_Conservation_8-29-07.pdf

Source: http://www.seattle.gov/UTIL/Services/Yard/Natural_Lawn_and_Garden_Care/Rain_Water_Harvesting/index.asp

Updated: http://www.seattle.gov/util/About_SPU/Water_System/Projects/RainwaterPermit/


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