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Paso Robles Presentation
The powerpoint presentation I did in Paso R was too large to put on the site...so here's the core information here...

Hope for the future
  • Rainwater harvesting is a powerful solution in a world of problems - sustainable, no energy use if gravity fed 
  • Accessible potable water is in short supply globally - expected by 2025 to reach 70% of total accessible water withdrawal. Massive pressure on aquifers - already overdrafted on a worldwide level (taking out more than rain replenishing). 
  • Locally, Paso Robles is looking at 'overdraft of aquifers' within five years.  100% of Paso Robles water is from aquifers currently, with intention to include Nacimiento lake water as a supply next year.  The city draws from 2 aquifers - one reached its state mandated limit in 2005. The state is instituting increased aquifer monitoring as part of the "Safe, Clean, Reliable Drinking Water Supply Act - 2010).   Personally - I like my change at my pace. I like to understand the problem and move towards a solution rather than have change pushed on me. So I am taking more self-responsibility with my water (eg rainwater harvesting, conservation).
  • Paso Robles indicators of pressure on system? Water levels drop, wells dry up/collapse, dig deeper wells,quality of water dropping (PR has chloride, nitrate, increased TDS (total dissolved solids), sulfates (yellowing), antibiotics, unmonitored contaminants (e.g. atrazine)). Wa. state: has ancient arsenic in its groundwater, great lakes: sodium, radium. Pressure on groundwater showing up everywhere.
  • Test your water! Be aware through self-responsibility of exactly what is in your water
  • U.S. per capita (per person) domestic water use is huge and out of proportion to other nations.  A comparison with other U.S. cities shows Ca. looks reasonable, but in comparison to other nations experiencing drought (particularly Australia)..the per person consumption can be radically reduced - down from current indoor domestic P.R. consumption of 65 gpcd (gallons per capita per day) down to Brisbane Australia's 30 gpcd.
  • Energy and water are married. A solution to our water crisis, is also a big part of our energy problems (fossil-fuel produced energy = greenhouse gas emmissions= global warming/climate change). Reduce water use, reduce energy use = happy things that need water (everything), happy planet. California - 20% of electricity used is water related. Said to be as high as 30-35% in southern Ca. Also in Ca.: Natural gas - 30% is water related; 80m gallons of fuel.
  • Costs of not changing to rainwater harvesting - 1/ our high energy using water supply solutions are not sustainable.  How much do you think water or energy will cost in 10, 20 or 50 years? (The life of our houses - we are not accounting for the basics that run them and preparing for a resource stressed future 2/ Huge cost of softening water - in Southern Ca. report said to be cost of $95m for every 100mg/L of salt in water. 3/ Cut off from water in emergency since electricity cut that pumps water 4/ Less stormwater runoff, less erosion, less damage to environment, less energy to pump it away from our homes 5/ Match quality of water to quality of use (potable water not necessary to flush toilet or water garden) 6/ We need to be connected to what is available and what we are using..can't do that if far away in a lake or underground 7/ High cost of treating mixed water (good, bad, ugly all together..rainwater from roof, greywater, blackwater..often all processed together) 8/ Diversify our water supply sources - more eggs in your basket, best for drought protection 9/ Climate change affects catchments/lakes more negatively than roofwater supplies 10/ Water is capital!! Smart water managers will have a lot of it - money in the bank 11/ Good for the planet, good for us, good for our pocket $$$
  • Opportunity!!! 3/4 of built environment will be new or renovated by 2035
  • Blueprint for success (MORE WATER!!)...Harvest, re-use, conserve, differentiate (match quality to use)
PASO ROBLES, CALIFORNIA

Period of Record : 10/1/1901 to 12/31/2005


Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Annual

Average Max. Temperature (F)

61.1

64.0

67.8

73.7

80.0

86.6

92.7

92.9

89.3

81.1

69.3

61.7

76.7

Average Min. Temperature (F)

33.0

36.4

38.5

40.2

44.1

47.7

50.8

50.0

47.4

41.9

35.7

32.3

41.5

Average Total Precipitation (in.)

3.15

3.16

2.40

1.05

0.28

0.05

0.03

0.04

0.19

0.55

1.39

2.63

14.91

Average Total SnowFall (in.)

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

Average Snow Depth (in.)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Percent of possible observations for period of record.
Max. Temp.: 70.3% Min. Temp.: 70.1% Precipitation: 70.3% Snowfall: 52.7% Snow Depth: 52.7%

 

Source: http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?capaso+sca


Monthly Adjusted Demands

Gallons / month

Showerhead LF

528

Bath

72

Clothes Washer (2 loads pppw)

184

Dishwasher (4x /wk)

48

Faucets (potable)

654

Monthly Demand

1486

 

Based on SLO avg. per household: 2.1 persons (rounded down to 2); Gallons per person per day (GPPD) = 50. Note: Toilet is assumed to be flushed with greywater or waterless.


CAN THE AVERAGE P.R. HOUSE SUPPORT ITSELF ON RAINWATER HARVESTING?..This table is based on average rainfall



 

Indoor demand

Irrigation

Total demand

Average rainfall

Collection surface size

Gallons/ft2 collection coefficient

Efficiency factor

Rainfall collected (80% efficiency)

End of month storage (starting with water in storage)

JAN

1,486

0

1486

3.15

2,500

0.62

0.8

        3,906

        3,420

FEB

1,486

0

1486

3.16

2,500

0.62

0.8

        3,918

        5,852

MAR

1,486

0

1486

2.4

2,500

0.62

0.8

        2,976

        7,342

APR

1,486

0

1486

1.05

2,500

0.62

0.8

        1,302

        7,158

MAY

1,486

0

1486

0.3

2,500

0.62

0.8

           372

        6,044

JUN

1,486

0

1,414*

0.05

2,500

0.62

0.8

              62

        4,692

JUL

1,486

0

1,414*

0.03

2,500

0.62

0.8

              37

        3,316

AUG

1,486

0

1,414*

0.04

2,500

0.62

0.8

              50

        1,951

SEP

1,486

0

1,414*

0.19

2,500

0.62

0.8

           236

           773

OCT

1,486

0

1,414*

0.55

2,500

0.62

0.8

           682

              41

NOV

1,486

0

1,414*

1.39

2,500

0.62

0.8

        1,724

           350

DEC

1,486

0

1486

2.63

2,500

0.62

0.8

        3,261

        2,126


*Note: Demand drop in summer...no baths in summer, only showers to a/c for less water gathered.

LOW YEARS RAINFALL CALCULATIONS (LIKE 1947: 4.2")...rainwater harvesting will always be supplemental*

*Although you could store massive amounts and process at a higher cost with UV filters etc


 

Indoor demand

Irrigation

Total demand

Average rainfall

Collection surface size

Gallons/ft2 collection coefficient

Efficiency factor

Rainfall collected (80% efficiency)

End of month storage (starting with water in storage)

JAN

1,486

0

1414

0.56

2,500

0.62

0.8

           694

        1,280

FEB

1,486

0

1414

0.97

2,500

0.62

0.8

        1,203

        1,069

MAR

1,486

0

1414

1.14

2,500

0.62

0.8

        1,414

        1,069

APR

1,486

0

1414

0.13

2,500

0.62

0.8

           161

 -

MAY

1,486

0

1414

0.28

2,500

0.62

0.8

           347

 -

JUN

1,486

0

1414

0

2,500

0.62

0.8

               -  

 -

JUL

1,486

0

1414

0

2,500

0.62

0.8

               -  

 -

AUG

1,486

0

1414

0

2,500

0.62

0.8

               -  

 -

SEP

1,486

0

1414

0.04

2,500

0.62

0.8

              50

 -

OCT

1,486

0

1414

0.32

2,500

0.62

0.8

           397

 -

NOV

1,486

0

1414

0.18

2,500

0.62

0.8

           223

 -

DEC

1,486

0

1414

0.62

2,500

0.62

0.8

           769

 -


HIGH YEARS LIKE 1941: 29.2"


 

Indoor demand

Irrigation

Total demand

Average rainfall

Collection surface size

Gallons/ft2 collection coefficient

Efficiency factor

Rainfall collected (80% efficiency)

End of month storage (starting with water in storage)

JAN

1,486

0

1486

4.73

2,500

0.62

0.8

        5,865

        5,379

FEB

1,486

0

1486

8.16

2,500

0.62

0.8

     10,118

     14,012

MAR

1,486

0

1486

6.14

2,500

0.62

0.8

        7,614

     20,139

APR

1,486

0

1486

2.76

2,500

0.62

0.8

        3,422

     22,076

MAY

1,486

0

1486

0.19

2,500

0.62

0.8

           236

     20,825

JUN

1,486

0

1486

0

2,500

0.62

0.8

               -  

     19,339

JUL

1,486

0

1486

0

2,500

0.62

0.8

               -  

     17,853

AUG

1,486

0

1486

0.02

2,500

0.62

0.8

              25

     16,392

SEP

1,486

0

1486

0

2,500

0.62

0.8

               -  

     14,906

OCT

1,486

0

1486

1.34

2,500

0.62

0.8

        1,662

     15,082

NOV

1,486

0

1486

0.7

2,500

0.62

0.8

           868

     14,464

DEC

1,486

0

1486

5.15

2,500

0.62

0.8

        6,386

     19,364


Quality of water

  • Quality of water increases with 'best practices' ...see "Info. page the basics" on this website for detailed list of  'best practices'
  • Maintenance program:

    Maintenance: initially - water quality test 1/  1/4ly: remove leaf litter, filter maintenance, first flush 2/ annually: water quality test if warranted & backflow prevention device if underground tank; uv light change 3/ remove sludge 1-2 years

  • Costs for set up for potable water - $14,700 (assuming you already have low water using fixtures) - $20,000 for a new well to be dug.. better choice finacially, economically...and your well has collapsed repeatedly, or the flows drop...


WelcomeAbout WatersmartInfo page: the basicsProductsNews and EventsPaso Robles PresentationImage GalleryFavorite LinksContact MeBees